- LULU / PANDORA'S BOX
- DAPHNIS AND CHLOE
- FEDRA
- THE FUGITIVE KIND
- THE TESTAMENT OF ORPHEUS
- PHAEDRA
- HERCULES CONQUERS ATLANTIS
- YOUNG APHRODITES
- CONTEMPT
- PROMETHEUS FROM THE VISEVICE ISLAND
- SANDRA OF A THOUSAND DELIGHTS
- THE GOLDEN THING
- THE TRAVELLING PLAYERS
- EURIDICE BA 2037
- IPHIGENIA
- A DREAM OF PASSION
- CLASH OF THE TITANS
- THE YEARS OF THE BIG HEAT
- ENIOCHUS - THE CHARIOTEER
- ANTIGONE
- EDIPO ALCADE
- THAT'S LIFE
- BLADE RUNNER
- VERTIGO
- MOURNING BECOMES ELECTRA
- ORPHEUS
- PANDORA AND THE FLYING DUTCHMAN
- ULYSSES
- HERACLES AND THE QUEEN OF LYDIA
- BLACK ORPHEUS
- ANTIGONE
- ELECTRA
- JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS
- ‘«Ň GORGON
- OEDIPUS REX
- ‘«Ň ILLIAC PASSION
- THE CANNIBALS
- ŐEDEA
- NOTES FOR AN AFRICAN ORESTEIA
- FOR ELECTRA
- PROMETHEUS IN THE SECOND PERSON
- VOYAGE TO CYTHERA
- ULYSSES' GAZE
- ‘«Ň MATRIX
- O BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU?

PROMETHEUS FROM THE VISEVICE ISLAND
PROMETEJ S OTOKA VISEVICE
Yugoslavia, 1964


Directed by: Vatroslav Mimica. Screenplay: Vatroslav Mimica, Slavko Goldstein, Krunoslav Quien. Director of Photography: Tomislav Pinter. Set Design: Zeljko Senecic. Costume designer: Maja Jericevic. Music: Miljenko Prohaska. Film editor: Katja Majer. Cast: Slobodan Dimitrijevic, Mira Sardoc, Janez Vrhovec, Dina Rutic, Pavle Vuisic, Husein Cokic, Dragomir Felba. Production: Jadran Film (Zagreb). Duration: 94 minutes. Black and white.

Mate, the director of a factory in a big city, along with his current partner, visits his birthplace, the island of Visevice, to attend the inauguration ceremony of a monument dedicated to the soldiers who died in battle in the Second World War. On the ship, a happy group of people sings partisan songs but Mate, who is almost sad about this return journey, does not share their joy. One of the passengers approaches and shows Mate a photograph with him among other partisans. When Mate disembarks on the island and starts walking around the streets, the old photograph comes to life and Mate starts remembering scenes from his past: his childhood, his first wife, a teacher and, above all, moments from the Resistance and events that took place after the Liberation. Mate became a member of the Communist Party but his efforts to modernise his island (mainly, to bring electricity) met with the resistance of the conservative villagers who gradually abandoned him and his wife. For this reason, he decides to leave the island and begin a new life. During the inauguration ceremony he makes a pompous speech, as protocol demands, and he embarks on the ship leaving for ever (?) his mother country and the tormenting memories.

Memory’s Merciless Burden
by Babis Aktsoglou
Vatroslav Mimica, one of the best cartoonists of the Zagreb school, stood out in the mid ‘50s thanks to a series of short films characterised by originality in direction and graphics. These films were also characterised by the existence of the Kafkaesque absurd, which we also find in Prometheus from the Visevice Island; the fourth film that put Mimica in the limelight of cinematography. Mimica’s Prometheus was filmed during a flourishing period of Yugoslavian cinema and opening up to European innovation (mostly with the work of Aleksandar Petrovic and Dusan Makavejev. This film is about the merciless burden of memory and uses flashback in the literal sense of the word: not as a linear composition of the past events that influenced the hero’s young life, but rather like a flash, a quick image of the memory. Mate, the hero of the Yugoslavian resistance, does not console himself for helping Zeus/Tito win the Titans/Germans. On the contrary, like a contemporary Prometheus, he wants to bring electric light/fire to the villagers, but they are not able to appreciate his gift. Zeus/The Communist Party abandons him and his punishment consists of the lack of appreciation and the hero’s fall from his pedestal followed by the exile to the inland.
The film is an allegory criticising the end of the ideals and the responsibilities of the Communist Party. However, it is not attracted by the rhetoric and the didactic character of socialist realism. On the contrary, it constructs a complex filmic discourse based on the effects of editing; a typical characteristic of many other films of the same period (Mimica himself speaks of how the Czech director Jan Nemec influenced him). The scenes of the past, extremely brief at first but longer as time passes, never roll in a linear form but are confused in time and are sometimes repeated. But this is real memory, isn’t it? Memory is an amalgam of old images and events and not a story of the past narrated in chapters (as in all flashback academic approaches). The film had a great impact on the Yugoslavian cinema and its international success motivated many other young directors to turn towards the current events of their times signifying the phenomenon of the Yugoslavian nouvelle vague. This "Prometheus", finally, changed something – at least in his country’s cinema.